Zimmerman Reed is investigating allegations that the largest turkey producers have engaged in price fixing and other anti-competitive conduct. In a recently filed lawsuit, restaurants, caterers, and other similar businesses have alleged that beginning in 2010, those large turkey producers, including Tyson Foods and Jennie-O, conspired to fix prices of turkey products. If true, this practice would constitute a violation of state and federal antitrust laws.

If you own a restaurant, catering company, or a similar business, and purchased turkey products from a food distributor from 2010 through 2016, you may have overpaid as a result of this alleged price fixing scheme. To learn about the case and your legal options, fill out a free, no-obligation case review form below or call us at 800.887.8029 to learn how we may be able to get back amounts your business overpaid.

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Turkey Product Antitrust Background

As restaurants, caterers, and other similar businesses have alleged in a recently filed lawsuit, the turkey market is dominated by three large companies. Butterball, Jennie-O-Turkey, and Cargill allegedly account for 50% of the total market, with a group of smaller companies possessing less than 5% market share each. A small number of companies holding such a substantial amount of market power would give large producers leverage and opportunity to influence prices throughout the market.

Allegedly as early as 2010, turkey producers acted together to artificially reduce the supply of turkey for sale in the United States, knowing that a reduced supply would increase prices. The lawsuit alleges that by sharing confidential production information with one another through Agri Stats, a corporate intelligence firm, these producers coordinated their supply reductions. If the lawsuit’s allegations are proven, from at least 2010 to 2017, turkey prices would have been artificially inflated.

This alleged meaningful cooperation may be a violation of state and federal antitrust laws, which promote competition and protect small businesses.

Turkey Price Fixing In the News

August 2, 2021: ‘Is this legal?’: Why an obscure meat data company has been sued nearly 100 times for facilitating anti-competitive behavior, counter.org

October 27, 2020: Tyson, Cargill, Hormel, Butterball to Face Turkey Cartel Claims, bloomberglaw.com

How We Can Help

If you own a restaurant, catering company, or other similar business, and purchased turkey products from a food distributor from 2010 through 2016, you may have overpaid as a result of this alleged price fixing scheme. To learn about the case and your legal options, fill out a free, no-obligation case review form below or call us at 800.887.8029 to learn how we may be able to get back amounts your business overpaid.